The sound of listening

Trumpet virtuoso Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah returned this year to the Montreal Jazz Festival with a brand new sextet, blessed with the fresh air of all his young musicians. For three consecutive nights this 33-year-old New Orleans-born musician filled the Gesù with high-quality music – and energy. Thursday was for his sextet, but on Friday and Saturday Scott aTunde Adjuah shared stage with Charlie Hunter and Lizz Wright, respectively. Three shows that he used to present his latest project: Stretch Music.

 

“It’s a communicative ability”

Lights are soft. Red tones.

“With a vocabulary not learned in any way you can point at, someone can say four words and break your heart”

Whispers, someone screaming at the back of the room. All eyes on the stage.

“Ultimately it becomes about whether or not you are willing to see yourself”

Five shadows climb on the stage. Wild applause.

“When certain people play, I feel as if they are tapped into a source that most people never get to, but it is not external, it is internal.”

Piano, bass, drums, flute, saxophone, trumpet. Soldiers to your posts.

“The players that have the most captivating, pointed, original and unique sounds are the ones that irradiate it, in one way or another. It is always something that comes from your core.”

And then, the pianist caresses the keys, the bass dances with its huge wooden instrument, drummer hits the toms, unexpected whistle coming out of the flute, a whispered cutting sound hitting the microphone straight from the trumpet.

Powerful, smashing, spectacular, grandiose.

It’s music. And it comes straight from their cores.

Continue reading →

Advertisements